HSING I CHUAN

Hsing I or Xsingyi (pronounced Shing Yee) means Mind Shape Boxing.  It has been around for almost a thousand years and has been constantly evolving.  Each generation of masters is expected to add something to the system to keep it relevant and up to date.


Hsing I harnesses both the mind and body as one to produce not only an effective self-defense system but builds health, strength, and mental clarity in the process.


For an extremely old system Hsing, I am amazingly modern in practice.  Its techniques are practical, compact and to the point.  Regular practice helps build internal energy via Qigong (energy building) and then circulates it throughout your body when practicing the training drills.  By harnessing your mind and body you develop focused attention, build mental and physical resilience and coordination.  All of these qualities enhance your everyday life, job and play.

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Syllabus.

The 5 Fists – these are the 5 major movements of Hsing I and on which the intermediate and advanced skills are based upon.  These 5 fists are;
1 Pi (splitting) where the action is done in a chopping motion like chopping with an ax.


2 Peng (crushing) is a straight line punch made famous by Kuo Yun Shen master Hines great, great grandmaster.


3 Chuen (screwing punch) – a short-range uppercut punch. In mandarin, it is written as Tsuan


4 Pao (exploding) – is a parry and upward punch and sidestepping.


5 Wang (crossing) – a sweeping punch that attacks from an oblique angle that moving sideways. In mandarin, it is written as Heng.


Once proficiency has been gained and assessed the students may be moved on to;

12 Animals Forms
It is extremely important that before moving on to the animals you have a thorough and effective grasp of the 5 Fists and its multitude of applications.  The 5 Fists are a stand-alone system in itself and an essential requirement.  If you practiced nothing else in Hsing I except the 5 fists this would be move then enough.


However, the 12 animals are an advanced addition to the 5 Fists.  The animals are derived from the 5 Fists and add an extra layer of sophistication.

12 Animals Forms
It is extremely important that before moving on to the animals you have a thorough and effective grasp of the 5 Fists and it multitude of applications.  The 5 Fists are a stand-alone system in itself and an essential requirement.  If you practiced nothing else in Hsing I except the 5 fists this would be move then enough.
However, the 12 animals are an advanced addition to the 5 Fists.  The animals are derived from the 5 Fists and add an extra layer of sophistication.


The 12 Animals forms are;
1 Dragon – Derived from Pi.  The Dragon is seen as a snake that flies.  The movements are lithe as it rises and sinks with all of the chopping movements of Pi.  The dragon develops tremendous strength in your legs.


2 Tiger – weaves from side to side and attacks from the side.  The form mimics the movements of a Tiger moving through a bamboo forest constantly turning to get around the tightly packed trees.  The Tiger is not only extremely powerful but also is smart choosing to launch blitz attacks on its prey when they least expect it.


3 Monkey – is quick and agile and chooses speed to overpower.  It develops strength and agility in your legs and hips.  


4 Horse – turns from side to side and strikes out and down with its fists (hooves). Its movements are constantly rising and falling.  These techniques are very effective for self-defense but also develop strength in your chest, shoulders, and upper body.


5 Crocodile – moves exactly like it namesake in the wild. Always looking forward but moving from side to side.  The Crocodile Form moves not only forwards and backward to.  Its self-defense application is short lateral parries with strikes to the head and ribs.


6. Chicken – Sometimes called Rooster.  These might seem unlikely animals to use in self-defense, but they can be not only ferocious but vicious too.  We teach 3 different versions of Chicken which encompass uppercutting and chopping in its self-defense repertoire.


7 Harrier – or Sparrow Hawk.  Its movements are compact swooping down and immediately shooting up upwards.


8 Swallow – just like the Swallow it swoops down and immediately upwards striking upwards.


9 Snake – moves like its namesake swiftly chopping down the guard and striking upwards.  It is performed in a very similar way to a Snake coiling and then lashing out ferociously.


10 Tai – pronounced Toi is a bird that became extinct some 300 years ago.  It was a small ostrich that obviously could not fly but ran fast across the marshes that were its home.  It goes to show that because Hsing I has been around for such a long time it has seen not only dynasties come and go but whole species too. 


11/12 Eagle Bear – this is a combination of both animals which the clawing and seizing movements of the Eagle and the clubbing strikes of the Bear.  Like its namesakes this form weaves from side to side clawing, seizing and clubbing with powerful angular strikes.

At the moment we are only teaching a more advanced class Hsing I who have been training for at least 2 years and upwards of 20 years so would not be suitable newbies.  However, Master Hine may be running workshops or even an online course.  If you would be interested in either of these options please drop us an email or reach out here.